Steven  Maislin

Steven Maislin

Broker, Certified Specialist IRES, ABR, SRS, SRES, RENE

RE/MAX Realtron Realty Inc, Brokerage *

Mobile:
416-518-7701
Office:
416-782-8882
Email Me
Steven  Maislin

Steven Maislin

Broker, Certified Specialist IRES, ABR, SRS, SRES, RENE

RE/MAX Realtron Realty Inc, Brokerage *

Mobile:
416-518-7701
Office:
416-782-8882
Email Me

The top 7 ways real estate agents annoy clients

 

The top 7 ways real estate agents annoy clients

The last thing you want to do is upset your real estate clients. Satisfied clients refer more business your way, and happy clients go a long way in making your job more enjoyable.

If you’ve ever sensed annoyance, anger or frustration in your client’s demeanour, you might be guilty of one of the following seven things that aggravate clients.

1. Not responding promptly

When you help clients buy a home — whether their first or last — it’s an emotional and stressful time.

Although it’s important to set expectations so you’re not responding to frantic texts at 2 a.m., you should try to respond during business hours and within two hours of receiving a message.

“There is no reason not to keep in touch. We have texting, emailing and calling. Being busy is not an excuse either,” Denise Supplee from Spark Rental said.

“If one of my clients calls me, and I cannot answer right away, I will text them and let them know I am busy. This at least lets them know that I received their call and that I am not going to blow them off.”

2. Showing up unannounced

Clients selling homes don’t like to live like doomsday preppers, ready to leave with their go bag at any moment.

Matthew Young from Autus Properties has experienced this firsthand.

“The biggest complaint we have is short-notice showings. Many of our clients have children and pets, and having 30 minutes or less to get the house clean and get out the door is often inconvenient for them,” he said.

Give your clients a day’s notice if possible before you bring prospective buyers to their homes.

But also follow Young’s advice to strike a happy medium. “I always remind them that the next buyer through the door could be the one who [might] ultimately purchase the house.”

3. Having an outdated website

Your website represents your brand. It’s also the most common way clients find you.

Create a top-notch website by posting high-definition photos, implementing user-friendly features and ensuring mobile compatibility.

Don’t make clients do more work than they have to.

Include updated contact information, current listings and recent sales in addition to your specialities and the times you’re available in the office or by phone.

4. Being tardy

Does it annoy you when your clients don’t show up or when they show up late? Of course. The same goes for them.

If you are running late, give them a call or text right away — and don’t make excuses. Clients are people too, busy with their own lives. Apologize for the inconvenience, and leave it at that.

5. Missing out on new leads

You are your client’s eyes and ears for homes coming on the market. Don’t miss when a new listing goes live by ensuring you have apps downloaded on your phone, a reliable internet connection and unlimited data.

Cut Cable Today” expert and homeowner Aaron Gunderson experienced this issue while house hunting.

“My wife and I were looking for a home for months, putting in offers and missing out every time. I was starting to get annoyed with our real estate agent because I thought he was slow to the draw,” he said.

As a real estate agent, you know how hot markets are. Get technology on your side so you can get the first offer in every time.

6. Ignoring their requests

Although you might have the best intentions, it’s frustrating, stressful and off-putting to clients when agents don’t listen.

This includes showing homes out of their budget, homes that don’t have the amount of bedrooms and bathrooms they need or homes in completely wrong neighbourhoods far away from work and amenities.

Listen to your clients, and give them what they ask for.

7. Being a salesperson

Buying a home is a huge decision. The last thing a client wants is for a pushy real estate agent to offer unsolicited opinions.

“We hear that agents are pushy a lot. Since their commission is tied to whether the buyer closes on the home, they really need the buyer to close in order to get a paycheck,” said Kevin Miller at Open Listings.

If you build a positive rapport with your clients, you can absolutely offer advice — but try not to unless they ask.

Alec Sears is a digital marketing expert and freelance writer in Salt Lake City. 

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